Irish air tax scrap prompts further calls to UK

Irish air tax scrap prompts further calls to UK

Campaigners battle to reduce tax

Campaigners battle to reduce tax

Dublin map
Passengers travelling from Dublin will not pay an airline fee from April

The news that the Republic of Ireland is to scrap its air travel taxes has prompted further calls for the UK to do the same.

Earlier this week it was announced the country will scrap its EUR3 (GBP2.53) tax charge on flights which would come into force next April.

The news will become as a particular worry for Northern Ireland, which is already losing out to flight traffic to Dublin especially long-haul routes.

Rules in the Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK mean passengers pay GBP13 each for short-haul flights and GBP94 for long-haul routes, both of which have increased significantly in recent years.

Campaigners behind the A Fair Tax on Flying campaign urged government to ‘take note’ of the Irish counterparts, which has followed Holland and Denmark in abandoning flight taxes.

“The fact that the Irish Government has abolished what was an already very low air travel tax highlights just how negatively such taxes impact on economic competitiveness, and the vitality of the aviation and tourism industries. The Irish Government understood that the tax was damaging, and they have acted.  The UK Government should take note, and take urgent action to counter the negative impact APD is having on UK competitiveness,” said ABTA’s head of public affairs Stephen D’Alfonso.

Earlier this week A Fair Tax on Flying announced 250 CEOs and directors had signed a petition asking for APD to be reduced. 

Gary Marshall
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Gary Marshall
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Airports & Aviation