New global tracking device developed to locate aircraft

New global tracking device developed to locate aircraft

InFlightLabs' Smart ELT device can "locate any aircraft within moments of a crisis"

InFlightLabs' Smart ELT device can "locate any aircraft within moments of a crisis"

Smart ELT can "locate any aircraft within moments of a crisis"
Smart ELT can “locate any aircraft within moments of a crisis”

A new device has been developed that can track aircraft anywhere in the world.

New York-based InFlight Labs has created the Smart Emergency Location Transmitter (Smart ELT), which it says is “tamper-proof”, and the world’s first air traffic control-activated aircraft tracking system.

The new device could be used by air traffic controllers to locate any aircraft within moments of a crisis, such as the loss of flight MH370.

“The tamper-proof Smart ELT is a game-changer for locating distressed or missing aircraft,” said company spokesperson, Joseph Bekanich.

“This technology could have located and tracked Malaysian Air 370 through all phases of flight if it was available at that time. We have developed Smart ELT so that another incident like Malaysian Air 370 never happens again.”

Smart ELT
Click here to view Smart ELT

Smart ELT sends a GPS-based emergency alert to a global search and rescue satellite. The activation of the ELT will then enable GPS and ground stations to continually track the aircraft’s location.

InFlight Labs said the device will also send a message to aviation and government authorities “within moments of an incident”.
“Smart ELT is a powerful asset that will offer real-time assistance to track missing or distressed aircraft on a world-wide basis” Bekanich added.

The tracking of commercial aircraft has become a key issue in the aviation industry since the disappearance of flight MH370. Earlier this year, ICAO approved measures that will see aircraft report their positions every 15 minutes when flying over remote areas. This has already been implemented on several carriers, including Qantas and Malaysia Airlines.

Mark Elliott
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Mark Elliott
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